the seal of the medieval priory
Catholic League Pilgrimages
early Pilgrimages 1926-41

 
Together with the League of Our Lady, The Catholic League provided the earliest framework of regular group pilgrimages to the restored Shrine. What follows are all the reports of CL pilgrimages in their journal The Messenger from 1926. The pilgrimage in 1926 was made by a group of priests, and the first general pilgrimage was made in the following year. These great early pilgrimages are brought vividly to life here, and we are able to link from this page to photographs from the Shrine archives (click on the photograph to go to a larger image; there are more photographs to be added later).
These extracts, from a bound volume lent us by a pilgrim, are reproduced here by kind permission of the Director of the Catholic League. (They have not yet been fully proof-read.)

Messenger 50: 1926
PRIESTS’ PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
A pilgrimage to the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham will be made by a number of C.L. priests on Whit Monday to Wednesday, as an act of Reparation for the insults offered to our Blessed Lord and His Mother by the heresies of Modernism and as an act of Intercession for Catholic reunion. This place, once the principal Shrine of Our Lady in England, with its copy of the Holy House of Loretto, and a goal of pilgrimage for all W. Christendom, is under its Vicar, Fr Hope Patten and with the cooperation of the L.O.L. becoming once again a home of devotion to which hundreds go every year as pilgrims. The site of the old Shrine in the Abbey is now, alas, but a green sward in the grounds of a lay owner, but a beautiful figure of Our Lady of Walsingham, copied from an ancient seal depicting the image burnt by impious hands at the great Pillage, is set in the Church and perpetually venerated. We hope that this pilgrimage will lead to the organisation of a C.L. pilgrimage open to all members later on.

Messenger 52: 1927
PILGRIMAGES
Members of the League are invited to join in the C.L. Pilgrimage to Our Lady of Walsingham. It has been arranged that the pilgrims leave London on Whit-Tuesday, meeting first for Mass at St Magnus’. It involves sleeping two nights at Walsingham and returning by midday Thursday.

A wonderful work has been done by Father Hope Patten and his coadjutors in this old-world village to revive the ancient devotion to Our Lady. A replica of the old image, burned at Chelsea in the great pillage of the sixteenth century times of horror, forms a shrine in the transept of the beautiful parish Church. We are able to visit the mediæval Slipper Chapel and the ruins of the old Abbey where, alas! only the site of the ancient wooden House of Mary built in imitation of the House at Nazareth can now be found, and also the three wells in the Abbey grounds, so long a scene of miraculous answers to prayer, and recently blessed in no small measure.

The pilgrimages are very well organised, with beautiful services and a torchlight procession, and no one who can possibly come should miss this opportunity of helping to make again this shrine a centre of fervent piety and widespread influence for the conversion of England.

Messenger 54: 1927
FIRST C.L. PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
A Pilgrimage is being arranged for members of the League to this once famous and beloved shrine of Our Lady in Norfolk. It is our wish to do our part in the revival of devotion at this holy place that once more it may be a fervent centre of true religion. The League of Our Lady has led the way in this revival and has two pilgrimages this year. The pilgrimages are well ordered under the inspiration of Father Hope Patten, and include a visit to the site of the old “House of Mary” in the Abbey ruins. To see the reverent crowd there and at the ancient Wells of healing amidst the remnants of the Monastery is to see the wonderful life again springing in the English Church amid the ruins of the Reformation. The old village Church with its beautiful replica of the ancient image of Our Lady of Walsingham and the warm welcome from the villagers, such a large proportion of whom are practising Catholics; the pilgrim hostel of Our Lady, Star of the Sea, maintained by the good Sisters from Horbury, hard by the cottages many of which are the old pilgrim hostels adapted; all these are unforgettable in inspiring memories.

The pilgrims leave London at 3,00 on Whit-Tuesday after Mass in St Magnus’ at 12.15 and stay until midday on Thursday after Whitsun. The inclusive charge for fares and lodging and board is £2.13.6 Full particulars from Miss E Few, C.L. Office.

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Messenger 58: 1928
PILGRIMAGE OF OUR LADY OF WALSINGHAM
The Second C.L. Pilgrimage to this ancient shrine will be made from Tuesday, June 19th to the 21st, under the direction of Fr Fynes-Clinton. The order of Pilgrimage is –

Tues 12.15 Sung Mass and Blessing of Pilgrims in St Magnus’, (Monument Station).
3.00 Leave King’s Cross, motor from Fakenham to Walsingham.
7.15 First visit to Shrine, Sol. Vespers, Address and Confessions.
Wed 7.00 High Mass and Low Masses. 10.30 Stations. Visit Pilgrim (“Slipper”) Chapel at Houghton in the Dale.
3.00 Rosary Procession from Church to Site of Holy House in the Abbey grounds. Prayers at the Holy Wells.
7.30 Sol. Vespers and outdoor Procession.
Thurs 8.00 Holy Communion. 10.15 Last Address and Mass.
12.30 Leave: Arrive King’s Cross 4.30 pm
All meals at the Hospice of Our Lady, Star of the Sea.

We hope that as many members, especially Priests, as possible will join this Pilgrimage. The development of Walsingham into a centre once more of Faith and Devotion is of vital importance to the Catholic Counter-reformation, and the League must do all it can to foster it. All Catholics are welcome to join in this Pilgrimage.

The charge inclusive of fares, board and lodging, is £2.12.6. Pilgrims coming by other routes are charged £1.6.0 exclusive of fares.

The C.L. Fraternity of Our Lady de Salve Regina, in St Magnus’ Church has presented a large votive Candle to the Shrine at Walsingham, and the Pilgrimage Association there has presented one to the Fraternity Shrine in token of our common Devotion and the mutual sympathy and prayers that are we hope a growing bond between the peaceful country shrine and the church in the heart of the hurrying City, from the Altar of which the Pilgrimages regularly start.

Messenger 59: 1928
C.L. PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
The C.L. Pilgrimage to Walsingham was this year from June 19th to 21st and although this time was not so suitable to members as the date of last year (Whit week) and the attendance therefore somewhat smaller, those Priests and layfolk taking part felt that there was the true Catholic atmosphere both devotional and social of a great pilgrimage. The arrangements throughout were excellent and we must thank our C.L. Pilgrimage Secretary, Miss Few and also Miss Lloyd, the Secretary of the Walsingham Pilgrimages, for their every attention to our wants.

Walsingham is rapidly becoming a Catholic centre, and English Catholics must strive to the utmost to bring to England the old times when thousands and thousands of Pilgrims visited “The Holy Land of Walsingham” each year. The Shrine in the ages of Faith was as great a centre of Devotion to Our Lady as Lourdes in proportion to the means of travel of those days and as well known throughout Europe. This year there are no less than seven “Great Pilgrimages,” and it is to be hoped that next year there will be at least one every week. Then truly England will become once more “Our Lady’s Dowry” in its full meaning.

Our Pilgrimage started with Mass and the Blessing of Pilgrims at St Magnus’ by London Bridge, and those of us who came from London caught the 3 o’clock from King’s Cross and on arrival at Fakenham cars were waiting to take us the five miles to Walsingham Church, where we met other Pilgrims from all parts. Met by the Rector at the doors, we immediately paid a first visit to the shrine which is in the Chapel of the Church where the Blessed Sacrament is reserved. One of the great lessons brought before us is the close union of devotion to Our Lady with the Blessed Sacrament, and throughout the Pilgrimage this thought is very much brought to the front. After this supper is served at the Hospice of Our Lady Star of the Sea, kept by Sisters of St Peter’s, Horbury, and everything is exceedingly well arranged.

The Pilgrimage was under the direction of Fr Fynes-Clinton, who based his addresses on the first Pilgrimage to our Lady: that of the Shepherds at Bethlehem. Then followed the first Vespers in Church and Confessions. In the morning there were High Mass well sung and served by the Choir and Servers of the village, and Masses said by all the Priests on the Pilgrimage. Stations of the Cross, followed by a visit to Houghton St Giles’ and the Slipper Chapel there, occupied the morning. The Slipper Chapel is so called, because here, about a mile from Walsingham the Pilgrims in the olden times used to take off their shoes and complete the journey barefoot. In the afternoon the central act of the Pilgrimage took place. A Rosary procession through the village to the site of the original Shrine, alas, now in ruins. This was in the Abbey of Walsingham, and was known throughout the world as “England’s Nazareth,” and was chosen by Our Lady herself who appeared in a vision to Lady Richeldis in 1061 and directed that a Chapel, after the model of the Holy House at Nazareth, should be built in honour of the Mystery of the Incarnation. As a proof of this vision healing waters suddenly burst forth in the meads. The visit to the site of the House is followed by one to these wells and the Pilgrims drink of the waters, and any sufferers are bathed with the water. In the evening Solemn Vespers are followed by a Procession in the Churchyard and Devotions and the Pilgrimage closes the next morning with Mass, Communion and a last Address.

The date of next year’s C.L. Pilgrimage has been fixed at the same season as last year, Whit-week, when we hope that a very large gathering of members and friends will be made. Book the dates now, Whit-Tuesday to Thursday.

Messenger 62: 1929
PILGRIMAGE OF OUR LADY OF WALSINGHAM
The Third C.L. Pilgrimage to this Shrine, the greatest of mediæval England and pearl of “Our Lady’s Dowry,” will be led by Fr Fynes-Clinton on Whit Tuesday. The order of Pilgrimage is –

Tues 12.15 Sung Mass and Blessing of Pilgrims in St Magnus’, (Monument Station).
3.00 Leave King’s Cross, motor from Fakenham to Walsingham.
7.15 First visit to Shrine, Sol. Vespers, Address and Confessions.
Wed 7.00 High Mass and Low Masses. 10.30 Stations. Visit Pilgrim (“Slipper”) Chapel at Houghton in the Dale.
3.00 Rosary Procession from Church to Site of Holy House in the Abbey grounds. Prayers at the Holy Wells.
7.30 Sol. Vespers and outdoor Procession.
Thurs 8.00 Holy Communion. 10.15 Last Address and Mass.
12.30 Leave: Arrive King’s Cross 4.30 pm
All meals at the Hospice of Our Lady, Star of the Sea.

We hope that as many members, especially Priests, as possible will join this Pilgrimage. The development of Walsingham into a centre once more of Faith and Devotion is of vital importance to the Catholic Counter-reformation, and the League must do all it can to foster it. All Catholics are welcome to join in this Pilgrimage.

The charge inclusive of fares, board and lodging, is £2.12.6. Pilgrims coming by other routes are charged £1.6.0, exclusive of fares.

The C.L. Tabernacle Treasury, formed by the alms of our members, has given a Crown for the Ciborium at Exposition in the Church of Walsingham, and this will be presented during the Pilgrimage.

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Messenger 63: 1929
THE WALSINGHAM PILGRIMAGE

Our third Annual League Pilgrimage took place from Whitsun Tuesday to Thursday and was attended by some 55 persons including several priests. We hope to make Whitsun week the regular annual season for our Pilgrimage. Those members who cannot come at this time would be very welcome at those organised by the League of Our Lady in May and August annually.

No one who takes part can fail to enjoy the time spent and also to rejoice that this shrine is becoming each year better known and loved and draws an increasing number of Mary’s children. In these days, when the Bishop of Birmingham delights to insult our Blessed Mother, (which all Catholics must take as worse than a personal insult to themselves) the work of reparation and of propagation of the Faith can be done in a very real and most powerful way by promoting these pilgrimages. The usual programme was followed under the direction of Fr Fynes-Clinton, but we sadly missed the presence of the Rector, Father Hope Patten, who was ill. Fr Wodehouse of St Paul’s, Oxford, preached and Bishop O'Rorke, formerly Bishop of Accra, kindly pontificated at Vespers and received us afterwards in the Refectory.

A priest, non-member, who took part writes as follows:-
The director said we had come to give honour and worship to God through the veneration of Mary, whose name had been for so long associated with this place and whose powerful intercession had won so many blessings for our forefathers. He touched on the social pleasure of a pilgrimage. We had come to be happy together in the home of our Mother, the place which she chose, and by our love and devotion to offer some small measure of reparation for the insults offered by English people in the time of the Reformation. It did not, like a Retreat, take us out of everyday life and sanctify our holidays and friendships with the remembrance of God, of Mary our Mother, and the Saints our friends. It was the work of God the Holy Ghost to take of the things of Christ and show them unto us. Amongst the things He had shown to the Church was the love and constant intercession of Mary, and at her shrine we were conscious of a renewed and enlarged perception of spiritual things. The impressions left upon me who shared the Pilgrimage are as follows:-

First, the perfection of the arrangements, and the smoothness of their working. Everything possible was done to eliminate distractions and to minister to the bodily and spiritual needs of the pilgrims. The devotions were sufficient to maintain the spiritual level, but no so numerous or prolonged as to cause fatigue, and the points of interest were brought into notice in such a way as to furnish constantly a fresh stimulus to devotion. The Pilgrimage was psychologically right.

Secondly, there was a marked absence of extravagance or self-consciousness. The writer must confess that when urged by a friend to join in the pilgrimage, he asked, with a remembrance of certain services which he had attended, whether there were likely to be many cranks in the party. There were none. The party was a happy family, and there was nothing extravagant as to devotion or attire to be seen. Devotion seemed to come easily in such surroundings, but it was a happy, quiet devotion; and there was, I think, a common perception of the nearness of the spiritual world, and of the love and intercessions of Our Lady and the Saints. The Social side of the gathering was all that could be desired; there was no one dull, and no one boisterous; no cliques and no neglect; lively conversation without scandal, keen arguments without heat. One believed that here were manifested more plainly than is common the fruits of the Spirit whose coming we were celebrating.

Thirdly, there was feeling that we were engaged in a work which might bring vast benefits to the Church in this land. It was a work of reparation. The Conductor more than once spoke of “our forefathers” as guilty of throwing down the holy images and defacing the painted figures of the Saints. The work of reparation is peculiarly our own. No others, however orthodox or devout, can make expiation for deeds done by Englishmen and sons of the English Church. We felt and hoped that the work would grow and that thousands and tens of thousands hereafter would stand where we stood and make their offering of sorrow for the shameful past. That there were abuses connected with the shrines of Our Lady and the Saints no one doubts; but that with the abuses should be swept away all veneration, all loving appeals, finally all perception of Sainthood, what Christian could approve? Not Erasmus, with all his satire; not the country people of England who often frequented the holy shrines and mourned what seemed the ruthless banishment of their friends and intercessors.

One sentence spoken by Fr Fynes-Clinton seemed to find an echo in the hearts of many. He said these pilgrimages might do more for English religion than Congresses and meetings. No Catholic, of course, would disparage the immense value of the Anglo-Catholic Congresses in arousing enthusiasm and imparting instruction. But it is the fact that English religion – sometimes even that of Anglo-Catholics – tends to be cold and rather rationalistic, with a weak sense of the supernatural. At Walsingham everything tends to increase and foster belief in the reality and powers of the spiritual world. Here one might well realise for the first time how warm and intimate our relations with that world can be, and how the dwellers in it, from the Blessed Mother downwards, are concerned with our sorrows and struggles, and love to help us with their intercessions. This quickened perception reacts upon devotion in other ways, and nowhere has the writer been so vividly conscious of the presence and love of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament as when here at the Shrine of Mary. Many gracious and marvellous things has God done for the Church in this land during the last hundred years. It may be that the revival of pilgrimage, in spreading abroad the perception of spiritual realities and powers, will prove to be the greatest of His blessings.

GIFT TO WALSINGHAM CHURCH
During the Pilgrimage a Crown to enhance the dignity of the Pyx at Exposition was presented by Mr Fisher, the General Secretary, as a gift from the Tabernacle Treasury. This Fund exists for the purpose of making grants for the adornment of Tabernacles or giving Monstrances, etc., where the Holy Sacrament is duly adored. In these times when we owe so much Reparation for the outrages offered to the Blessed Sacrament Reserved, members may be glad to know of this way of adding to the external worship that should be so greatly increased.

Father Hope Patten kindly writes:
“The Crown is most effective and everyone seems so pleased with it. We are using it for service constantly, and so the C.L. is represented every time. Please thank the League very much and tell them how disappointed I was in not being able to be with them on their pilgrimage.”

Messenger 66: 1930
THE WALSINGHAM PILGRIMAGE

The fourth C.L. Pilgrimage to this wonderful shrine will be made from Tuesday to Thursday of Whit-week. Full particulars can be obtained from the Pilgrimage Secretary at C.L. Office. Every member should resolve to offer the devotion and witness of this Pilgrimage at least once in reparation for the wrongs to Our Lady perpetrated in this age of unbelief, and intercession for the triumph of the Faith of our land. Director: Fr Fynes-Clinton

The order of Pilgrimage is –

Tues 12.15 Sung Mass and Blessing of Pilgrims in St Magnus’, (Monument Station).
3.00 Leave King’s Cross, Motor from Fakenham to Walsingham.
7.15 First visit to Shrine, Sol. Vespers, Address and Confessions.
Wed 7.00 High Mass and Low Masses. 10.30 Stations. Visit Pilgrim (“Slipper”) Chapel at Houghton in the Dale.
3.00 Rosary Procession from Church to Site of Holy House in the Abbey grounds. Prayers at the Holy Wells.
7.30 Sol. Vespers and outdoor Procession.
Thurs 8.00 Holy Communion. 10.15 Last Address and Mass.
12.30 Leave: Arrive King’s Cross 4.30 pm

All meals at the Hospice of Our Lady, Star of the Sea.

The inclusive cost of fares from London, board and lodging is £2/12/6. A Manual of Prayers and information for the Pilgrimage can be had for 1/6. Applications for room should be made as soon as possible to the Pilgrimage Secretary, St Magnus’, Lower Thames Street, E.C.3.

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Messenger 67: 1930
THE PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
Walsingham is the ancient National Shrine of Mary in England, and was known throughout Europe as England’s Nazareth. The Sanctuary was founded by a lady named Richeldis in the reign of St Edward the Confessor about the year 1061. Walsingham became the goal of countless pilgrims seeking to honour the Incarnation of our Lord and to obtain the prayers of his blessed Mother. The chief object of veneration was a small house or chapel, the original one began by Richeldis and transported by supernatural power to another site a good many paces distant. In this House was the image of the Mother of God known as Our Lady of Walsingham. Near by, and like the Holy House all under cover of the Abbey Church, were the Holy Wells which had sprung up when the Holy House was removed. In these miraculous waters pilgrims who had bodily disease bathed. The powerful intercession of Mary at Walsingham was signalized by countless miracles in that place from the time of the foundation of the Shrine until its destruction by Henry VIII in the 16th century. From that time until recently the fame of Walsingham dwindled and almost expired. The religious houses, notably the Abbey Church itself, were destroyed. The village forgot its erstwhile fame and prosperity and became insignificant and poor. Yet it is certain that during all those dark ages Walsingham was not forgotten, but that from time to time pilgrims made their way thither to make what reparation they could for the sacrilege and desecration that had overtaken the once-famous and holy Shrine. Some nine or ten years ago devotion to Our Lady of Walsingham flamed afresh under the inspiration and effort of the Rev. A. Hope Patten, who became vicar of the parish church. Not only was this pre-Reformation building repaired and made beautiful for Catholic worship once more, but the special devotion to Our Lady of Walsingham was restored within its walls. From the title-deed seals in the British Museum artists recovered the likeness of the ancient image of Mary and Jesus. A new image so fashioned was placed in the Lady Chapel of the parish church. Then pilgrims began to come, few at first, and then in large numbers. One of the ancient hostelries was purchased for the Pilgrimage Association and put into comfortable condition for the entertainment of modern pilgrims. It is in charge of Sisters of the Community of St Peter, Horbury, as the Hospice of our Lady Star of the Sea. Now there are two other hostels of SS Michael and George and of St Augustine.

In Whitsun Week this year it was my privilege as an American Priest to go to Walsingham with the Catholic League and Yorkshire Pilgrimage. We went on Whit Tuesday, June 10th. There were three groups to come. The largest, led by Fr Fynes-Clinton, came from London. Fr Ferrier and Fr Orr brought the Yorkshire pilgrims: I came with the group from St Paul’s, Oxford, with Fr Roger Wodehouse. In all there were about seventy.

The late afternoon sun flooded the Vale of Stiffkey, the holy land of Walsingham, when we gathered for the first formal act of our pilgrimage outside the church were the Shrine now is. The London Pilgrims were the last to arrive, but as soon as they did, led by Fr Fynes-Clinton, the Director of the Pilgrimage, we entered the church in procession singing the Litany of Loreto in Latin. That moment gave the keynote to the whole Pilgrimage. The pilgrims united in that procession coalesced at once into a spiritual family. Joy and peace, two notable fruits of the spirit, took possession of us all. Devotion inspired our hearts. Henceforth the spirit of prayer and gaiety came down upon us.

After our first visit, we returned to the Hospice of our Lady for supper and the business of getting acquainted with one another socially, no great difficulty seeing that we were all there in the love of our Lord and our Lady. In the evening we returned to the church for Vespers and a sermon by Fr Fynes-Clinton on the Pilgrimage of the Wise men. Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament ended our formal worship, and the pilgrims made their confessions and visited the Shrine, the altars, and the lesser shrines in the Church. The next morning, Wednesday, the twelve or fourteen Masses began at half past six and occupied the time until nearly nine o’clock with High Mass at seven. At half past ten the Director led the Stations of the Cross. Immediately afterwards the pilgrims walked informally, yet still in spirit of pilgrimage, the mile to St Giles’ Church at Houghton. Fr Leeds met us there and took us into the Church to recite the glorious Mysteries of the Rosary. Here again is an ancient church restored and adorned for Catholic worship. The pre-Reformation rood-screen still stands, an exquisite piece of religious craftsmanship, carved and painted, though the face of each saint depicted has been meticulously scratched out by non-believers in Protestant times.

From St Giles’ we walked in procession, singing the Litany B.V.M., to the exquisite architectural gem, the ancient “Slipper” Chapel of St Catherine, now the property of the English Benedictines in communion with the Holy See. Here in former days pilgrims arriving from the south put off their shoes to walk to Walsingham barefoot: hence the name of Slipper Chapel. We stood in the roadway outside the Chapel and said prayers for the reunion of Christendom, and then sand the Easter Anthem of our Lady, the Regina Cœli. Afterwards, in small groups, the pilgrims crowded into the tiny fane to say private prayers and to examine its interesting though bare interior. St Catherine’s has not been restored for worship.

The climax of the Pilgrimage came at three o’clock on Wednesday afternoon. The pilgrims assembled at the Shrine in the church and after Intercession set off in solemn order, singing the Sorrowful Mysteries, for the abbey grounds. The people of the village stood respectfully at their doors to watch the procession pass down the streets. We entered the abbey enclosure under the ancient gateway, one of the few standing remains of the old grandeur in stone of Walsingham. At the site of the Holy House, a grassy bank on the lawn, we fell to our knees, kissing the earth in reparation for its desecration and destruction. There we offered our prayers fervently and silently. Sight-seers and curious persons gathered around, surprised, at first amused, then awed and impressed by the evidence of faith and devotion of the pilgrims. Another visit was made to the location of the high altar. We knelt on the grass beneath the single arch, all that remains of the one-time glory of Walsingham Abbey Church. That arch stands, grand yet pathetic, as the witness in stone to our Lady of Walsingham. It is, in its way, the symbol of the fact that though the despoiler intended to eradicate Mary’s honour and glory in England he did not quite succeed, and the continuity of faith and love, Mary’s and man’s, still stands strong as an arch, bridging the centuries until the restoration come.

The last point of visitation was the Holy Wells. There are three wells, two small ones in round copies of stone, and a larger one like a great bath in a square pool, faced with stone. Here the miracles of our Lady’s intercession for the sick and afflicted were wrought in the days of faith and are now manifested once more in a number of authenticated instances. We stood about the wells, praying. Two priests ministered to those who wanted, the bathing of the waters. Many received this ceremonial and devotional washing. All of us drank of the water from the well, and each was given a small bottle of water to take home with him. After the visit to the abbey grounds, the vicar Father Hope Patten, entertained the Pilgrims to tea in the vicarage garden. No more beautiful and lively scene could be imagined than that tea-party on the smooth and sunny lawn. Everybody was so happy. Conversation buzzed gaily, and, of course, inevitably, we had a group photograph taken. In the evening there was Vespers again in the church. Dom Benedict Lee, OSB of Nashdom Abbey, preached a sermon. Then came the glorious procession of our Lady. The large congregation went forth with the pilgrims from the church, singing the Legend of Walsingham. All carried candles. The various sodalities and confraternities had their banners. Two young girls carried on their shoulders the Statue of the Virgin Mother of God. Outside, scores of people from the village and the countryside witnessed the procession. Around the churchyard we went and back into the church. Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament ended our day.

Again next morning, Masses occupied the early hours. After breakfast there was a last Mass for us all. It was a Low Mass with music, the organ and one or two hymns. No more impressive and devotional presentation of the Liturgy could have been possible. Everybody felt the beauty and solemnity of that act of worship. After Mass, at the Altar of St George, was venerated the Relic of St Vincent, and then passed into the Lady Chapel for our last visit to the Shrine. The final prayers were informal. We knelt crowded close together in the chapel. A multitude of candles burned about the Shrine. Above glimmered the silver lamps before the face of the Holy Mother, giving to the world the Divine Child in her arms. The leaders of the various groups of the Pilgrimage made the last thanksgivings and intercessions, then our Director blessed us and dismissed us. The Pilgrimage was over. T. BOWYER CAMPBELL

Messenger 69: 1931
ENGLAND’S NAZARETH

It is very desirable that the knowledge of this ancient English centre of devotion to Our Lady of Walsingham should be more widespread in our midst and that a Pilgrimage to it should be made at least once by every Catholic. With this object lantern slides have been prepared and can be hire (1d. each, carriage extra), together with a lecture if desired. We hope that all our priest-members will make use of these to bring the matter before their people. Those who have been always wish to go again; and for those who at present cannot go such a description of the history and liveliness of the village and its shrine will be of real value in showing the actual carrying out in the present day of the Catholic way of love and prayer.

The Council of the League initiated a Committee, with Miss Few as Secretary, for making a beginning of such propaganda. A successful concert, with the aid of Mrs Neal (Miss Kathleen Cooper) and her friends, was held in Kensington Town Hall, during which were shown some twenty of the slides of Walsingham, and the Rev Fr R Kingdon spoke on the Pilgrimage. We were able to hand over some £23 to the Walsingham Fund. This fund is in desperate need, and we again appeal for help, which should be sent as C.L. donations through Fr Fynes-Clinton. It is imperative that the Vicar, on whom the whole work depends, should have a “living wage.” For this and for the stipend of the Assistant Priest we need £500 a year.

The fifth Pilgrimage organised by the League will be again at Whitsuntide. We start after Midday Mass and Dedication at St Magnus’ on Whit Tuesday and return Thursday afternoon. Full particulars will be sent on application to Miss Few, C.L. Office. We hope for an increased number of members this year.

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Messenger 70: 1931
WALSINGHAM LECTURES

In order to promote a greater understanding and enthusiasm among Church people in the matter of Pilgrimages and especially of that to our own beloved Shrine of England’s Nazareth, the Walsingham Committee has initiated a plan of Lectures illustrated with Lantern Slides. The first was given in St Augustine’s Hall, Queen’s Gate, in April. Two Lectures and sets of slides are available for hire, the first on Pilgrimages in general with pictures of a large number of the greater holy places in Europe and Palestine: the second on Walsingham. These would be very suitable for parochial and Mary-Guild meetings, and we hope C.L. priests will help by giving them wherever possible.

A STEP FORWARD
Opposition to the honour given to Our Lady of Walsingham, long expected by those who know the ways of the enemy, has been stirred up and the Bishop has felt it incumbent on him to demand the removal of the Shrine from the Church. This, however, is likely to lead to a great increase of the devotion, as it is proposed to build a Chapel very close to the ancient site on ground secure in the hands of a trust, where the Sacred Image may rest. There, in a simple Home, constructed after the measure of the old Shrine, it will be we may hope safe from the vicissitudes of the abuses that may arise from future appointments, to the Vicarage. We most heartily commend the appeal issued by Father Hope Patten for £2,000 for the building. Donations to this and to the general Walsingham Fund will be gratefully received by Fr Fynes-Clinton, Chairman of the Walsingham Fund Council.

WALSINGHAM PILGRIMAGE
The fifth Annual Pilgrimage of the League will take place as usual on Whit-Tuesday, returning on Thursday, under the direction of Fr Fynes-Clinton. Our preacher will be the Very Reverend Arch-Priest Nicholas Behr, the distinguished and loved priest at the Russian Church in London. We hope that an effort will be made by all who can to take part in this critical year and to show our appreciation of the fact that for the first time a member of the glorious Martyr Church of Russia comes to share with us in our devotion. We hope that the Archdeacon, the Rev V Theocritoff may also come.

Our special Intentions this year will be (a) For the triumph of Our Lady’s cause at Walsingham; (b) for the liberation from persecution of the Church of Russia.

Messenger 71: 1931
WEEKEND PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
In response to a request from Walsingham, we are arranging a Bank Holiday Weekend Pilgrimage to the Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham. Full particulars on enclosed leaflet. Further copies of the Leaflet for handing to friends will be sent on receipt of a post-card at the Office and also posters for those who can arrange to have them displayed in Churches. This experiment, we hope, will make the Pilgrimage possible for those who cannot leave work during the week. Early applications are a great assistance to the organisers and also ensure accommodation, which the greater numbers expected may make it impossible to allocate to late applicants.

Messenger 72: 1931
NEW SHRINE AT WALSINGHAM
It is generally known by this time that opposition to the honour given to our Blessed Lady in her ancient and chosen home in England has led, we may be sure by Divine Providence, to the building of a new Chapel to house the holy Image, on ground secured under trust. The building which is nearing completion is the same in dimensions as the ancient one of “England’s Nazareth,” so renowned throughout Europe and gathering for five centuries countless throngs of the lovers of Mary. Wonderful have been the unexpected discoveries since the choice of the site. Without question it is part of the old Abbey grounds, even probably part of the court of Our Lady’s “House”: the old Saxon well discovered on the site of the new Chapel after the foundations were commenced, actually feeds the sacred well where the Pilgrims bathed by the Abbey Church: indeed this fact and the finding of Ancient foundations beneath the site point to the possibility that we have the very place Our Lady first chose for the primitive Shrine and holy springs.

The restoration of the National Holy Place is an act of witness both in England and throughout the world that some at least are faithful to pure Christianity; and the blessings that will inevitably follow the increase of devotion and prayer and be granted to Her intercession, will bring about more surely than all our controversies and polemics the Reformation of English religion which is the crying need of the times. Gifts of all manner of adornments and things for use in the Chapel and donations are asked for.

OPENING OF THE CHAPEL
All members are asked to attend this if at all possible, October 15th. Priests and Servers are asked to take part vested in the Pontifical Services and Procession of Translation of the Image: and others in veils and other insignia of Mary Guilds.
A special train is being run from Liverpool Street, London at 7.42 am and will return in the evening. Inclusive return fare 13/-. Voucher can be obtained from the C.L. Secretary at our office, to whom please signify whether the following will be required: Breakfast (2/6), Dinner (4/-) on the train: Buffet lunch (1/3), Tea (1/-) at Walsingham. The train will stop on both journeys at Cambridge and Wymondham, (fares in proportion). Application should be made as soon as possible enclosing fare, and tickets can only be had before the day. Please make this known.

Messenger 73: 1932
WALSINGHAM
The opening of the New Chapel and Shrine at Walsingham was a wonderful occasion of joy and witness to the Faith. The League was well represented. A full account will be found in “Ave”, the magazine of the “Society of Mary.” Many new pilgrims are already finding their way. Members may possibly have noticed a very silly attack made in the Church Times upon the devotion to OL of Walsingham but the experience of recent years shows that disapproval by this periodical supplies an assurance of soundness in the faith and desirability in practice. There is still a large debt upon the Chapel and its minimum of fittings and donations however small will be gratefully received at the C.L. Office.

The C.L. Annual Pilgrimage will be held as usual from Whitsun Tuesday to Thursday, unless another date be chosen in accordance with some wishes expressed. The Secretary would be glad to hear from members as to their preference of dates. We commend the National Pilgrimage to be organised in connection with the Centenary of the Catholic Revival in England, for the first week in July, 1933, as a great act of Witness to the Faith. Please send now a PC addressed to Centenary Pilgrimage, Walsingham Vicarage, Norfolk. Will you help? Will you endeavour to attend?

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Messenger 74: 1932
C.L. PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
Our sixth annual Pilgrimage is arranged for Whit-Tuesday to Thursday. The Right Reverend Bishop O'Rorke will be our preacher, and we hope that our Russian friend, Fr Nicholas Behr will again be our guest. As this is the first League visit to the new Sanctuary we must try to show our thanksgiving by increasing our numbers.
It is suggested that a Children’s Pilgrimage be held next year. The Secretary would be glad to hear of any who might be able to come. We commend the National Pilgrimage to be organised in connection with the Centenary of the Catholic Revival in England, for the first week in July 1933 as a great act of Witness to the Faith.

WALSINGHAM LECTURES
In order to promote a greater understanding and enthusiasm among Church people in the matter of Pilgrimages and especially of that to our own beloved Shrine of England’s Nazareth, the Walsingham Committee has initiated a plan of Lectures illustrated with Lantern Slides. Two Lectures and sets of slides are available for hire, the first on Pilgrimages in general with pictures of a large number of the greater holy places in Europe and Palestine: the second on Walsingham. These would be very suitable for parochial and Mary-Guild meetings, and we hope C.L. priests will help by giving them wherever possible.

An image of Our Lady of Walsingham, carved by Mr Martin Travers, has been erected in the Lady Chapel of St Magnus’ the Martyr, as the Shrine for the Fraternity de Salve Regina and a starting place for the Pilgrimages from London.

Messenger 76: 1933
CENTENARY PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM

In the week following the Anglo-Catholic Congress Centenary functions there is to be a Centenary pilgrimage to the Holy House. As far as the programme has been settled up to date it will consist of two parts. First, the ordinary three day pilgrimage from Tuesday to Thursday, with this exception that it is proposed to run a special train from London for the central day, July 19th, to bring pilgrims to Walsingham in time for the Pontifical High Mass which Bishop O'Rorke has kindly promised to sing. This special train will leave in time to get the pilgrims back to London in the late evening. Breakfast and Dinner will be served en route. Apart from this, the programme will follow the ordinary course. The second part is to consist of a weekend visit from July 22nd to either the next day or Monday, the 24th. The intention of the pilgrimage is to return thanks to God for the revival, especially the restoration of the Catholic teaching on the mystery of the Incarnation and Our Lady’s part in the Divine scheme of salvation. It is not too early to book now, and intending pilgrims should do so, as the accommodation is very limited. Applications can be made to the Pilgrimage Secretary, The Vicarage, Walsingham, accompanied with the booking fee of five shillings which is not returnable.

Please state clearly which pilgrimage you are booking for:-
(a) The two day visit, July 18th to 20th.
(b) The day visit (by train) July 19th.
The day visit (by road, making your own arrangements), July 19th.
(c) The week end pilgrimage, July 22nd.
Cost:-
(1) Two day pilgrimage, full board, return rail from London, etc. £2.11.0.
(2) Day pilgrimage, return rail, etc. (Excursion fare announced later).
(3) Weekend visit, full board, etc. (two nights) £2.11.0 (with rail).
Weekend visit, full board, etc. (one night), 14/- (without rail).
Late bookings may cost a little more, as it may entail sleeping in the neighbouring villages, and so extra cost for transport.

The C.L. will join with the Society of Mary in arranging the usual Pilgrimage in May: but this is intended for those who cannot attend those in July. A Children’s Pilgrimage is being arranged for August. Particulars from C.L. office.

Messenger 77: 1933
C.L. PILGRIMAGE TO O.L.O. WALSINGHAM
As we hope that all who possibly can, will attend the National Centenary Pilgrimage in July, we are arranging for May 30th to June 1st a joint pilgrimage with the Society of Mary, for those unable to go in July.

Director: The Rev H J Fynes-Clinton
Preacher: The Rev Fr Bede Frost, OSB
Cost of the Pilgrimage:-
The inclusive charges are – return fares from London via King’s Cross and Fakenham, and motor thence to Walsingham, full board and accommodation £2.11s. Pilgrims coming by other routes can obtain accommodation tickets (for full board and lodging), price £1.8s.6d.
Tea on the train for those coming from London, 1/- extra.
All meals, except tea on Wednesday, are taken at the Hospice of Our Lady Star of the Sea.
Pilgrims coming to Walsingham for the first time will find the Official Manual necessary, 1/3.
For forms of application send to C.L. Pilgrimage Secretary, C.L. Office, 11 City Road, EC1 or Pilgrimage Secretary, Walsingham Vicarage, Norfolk.

Order of Pilgrimage
Tuesday, May 30th
12.15 Sung Mass and Blessing of Pilgrims in the Church of St Magnus-the Martyr, (Monument Station).
3.00 Leave King’s Cross, arriving at Fakenham Town. Motor to Walsingham.
7.00 Arrive at Walsingham and first visit to the Sanctuary and Holy House.
8.30 Solemn Vespers, Address and Benediction. Confession. Evening visit to the Holy House.
Note – It is essential in order to make a good Pilgrimage to receive Absolution and the Most Holy Sacrament.
Wednesday, May 31st
7.00 High Mass with Holy Communion. Altars are provided for Priests from 6 o’clock onwards.
All Priests are asked to bring their own Amice, Alb, Girdle, Cotta and Missal.
10.15 Stations of the Cross, followed by visit to S Giles and the Slipper Chapel, at Houghton. (Invalids and elderly people desiring cars should notify the Secretary when booking rooms.)
3.00 Intercessions and “bathing” of the sick, followed by conducted visit to the Priory ruins and the mediæval Picenas. Entrance 6d.
6.00 Rosary and Salve in the Holy House.
7.30 Pontifical Vespers, Sermon and Benediction. Procession to the Holy House, (where Credo, Salve and Te Deum will be sung.)
Thursday, June 1st
8.00 Mass with Holy Communion. Private Mass of pilgrim Priests as above.
10.30 Mass with music and last Address. Final visit to the Shrine and blessing of the Pilgrims. Leave Walsingham.

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Messenger 79: 1934
PILGRIMAGES TO OUR LADY OF WALSINGHAM
For many years the C.L. has arranged an Annual Pilgrimage to Our Lady’s Shrine at Walsingham, and the usual three day mid-week Pilgrimage has been the rule. Many members cannot get away at such a time, and, moreover, the expense, £2.12s.6d has prevented many. It has been decided, therefore, this year to arrange a weekend Pilgrimage, and the date has been fixed for June 16th – 17th. The long days at this time, and we hope, fine weather, should make this a very joyous Pilgrimage, and early notice is given so that all can book the weekend. The cost is 24/- and the journey will be made by coach unless sufficient numbers are forthcoming to enable a special train to be chartered.
Will all members make a special effort to come, and encourage their friends also? It should be possible for parties to be arranged from various Churches, and if a sufficiently large party, about 30, came from any district, a special coach could be arranged to leave at a convenient centre. Full arrangements will be published in the next Messenger. We shall leave about 2 pm on the Saturday, arriving back about 10.30pm on Sunday. In the meantime, places can be booked at the C.L. Office or by Pilgrimage Secretary, Walsingham, with a deposit of 2s.0d. (non-returnable).

The Secretary would be very pleased to hear from any priests or laymen who would be prepared to make up a party, and it has been suggested Chapter Secretaries and others could take in weekly payments toward the cost. Such a method is very popular with our Roman brethren, and enables many to go to Pilgrimages and Retreats who otherwise could not do so. The RC Pilgrimage of the unemployed to Rome was made possible by many paying a small sum and the persons who represented them were chosen by lot. The League will also organise a joint Pilgrimage with the Society of Mary, for the mid-week in June, particulars of which can be obtained from C.L. Office.

FRIENDS OF WALSINGHAM
Our annual feast will be on Tuesday, January 30th, this year, as the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes falls on Sunday. We hope there will be a goodly number at the Mass at 12.15 at St Magnus’, and at the gathering to meet Fr Patten afterwards. Light luncheon will be obtainable in the Crypt if names are sent in beforehand. The Walsingham Fund is now faced with increased difficulty as we have to find the stipend of an Assistant Priest, whose help is absolutely necessary if the work is not to collapse. The village, sore-stricken by the agricultural depression, is doing its best to raise its proportion, while the squire and patron refuses to contribute the sum given by his predecessor for one of the three parishes for which there is no endowment; the position is made still more difficult by his withdrawal of the use of the house built for the assistant priest. And it must be remembered that the necessity of assistance is due not to the parish work, but to the presence of streams of pilgrims and the constant and heavy call made by them upon the overtaxed time and strength of the parish priest, to whom we all owe so much. The Council of the Walsingham Fund, confidently, therefore, and urgently, appeal for annual subscriptions, however small, for this fund. Please apply for tickets for the two concerts in aid of the Fund (see Notices) and bring friends. The tickets are free and there will be a silver collection.

Messenger 80: 1934
WEEKEND PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
We are arranging a weekend Pilgrimage this year instead of the usual one in mid week, full details are on enclosed leaflet together with application form for intending pilgrims. The Secretary is disappointed that at the time of going to press more applications have not been received, and hopes that all will seriously consider whether they cannot take advantage of this opportunity specially arranged at lower cost for those who owing to their work cannot go in the mid-week. All who are working for Catholic Reunion and who also are connected with this revived Devotion to O.L.O.W. feel more and more that there is an intimate connection between the two. To men anything approaching the near restoration of the Church in England to the Holy See may seem impossible, but we are sure that the cause of Reunion is very dear to the Heart of Our Blessed Lady, and we feel that we cannot supplicate her too much on behalf of this great cause. Therefore we beg all our members who long for this consummation of our work to join us in pilgrimage to the Shrine of Her choice.

Messenger 82: 1935
FRIENDS OF WALSINGHAM
The annual festal observance will be on Thursday, February 14th, at St Magnus’, when Solemn Votive Mass of Our Lady will be celebrated and the Rev A Father Mayhew, Vicar of St Cydrian’s, Clarence Gate, will preach. After Benediction at 1.30, “Friends” are invited to meet in the Crypt and, we hope meet Fr Hope Patten. Light luncheon will be served. The Walsingham Fund for the Assistant Priests’ Stipend is overdrawn and in great need; annual subscriptions, however small, are what we chiefly want.

Messenger 83: 1935
C.L. PILRIMAGE TO OUR LADY OF WALSINGHAM
The League is organising two Pilgrimages to Walsingham this summer. There will be our usual Whitsun Pilgrimage (Tuesday to Thursday after Whitsun) and a weekend one, journey by coach, May 18th to 19th. Full particulars enclosed with this Messenger. Members are again asked to do all in their power to urge friends to join in the Pilgrimages and thus honour Our Blessed Lady in Her National Shrine. Further leaflets can be had from C.L. Office. It is hoped to arrange a Priests’ Pilgrimage during the summer. Those interested are asked to write to the Pilgrimage Secretary, the Vicarage, Walsingham.

Messenger 84: 1935
PRIESTS’ PILGRIMAGE
A Pilgrimage for priests only is to be made on Monday, October 14 to October 16, with the intention of a wider revival of the Catholic Faith and Practices in England and in our own Parishes. It is hoped that most will be able to come by car, and those who have them or can get the loan of one are invited to give seats to others. The Pilgrimage programme begins at Walsingham at 7 pm Monday and ends at 9.30 am on Wednesday. Through the very kind generosity of some friends, the cost excluding journey will be only 10/-. We hope all our priest members will endeavour to take part and make it known to others. 2/6 booking fee should be sent to the Pilgrimage Secretary, the Vicarage, Walsingham, Norfolk, who will send further particulars. State whether willing to share room with another.

Messenger 85: 1936
PRIESTS’ PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM

The Priests’ Pilgrimage was held from October 14th to 16th and was well attended by about 35, half of whom had come for the first time. The addresses were given by Father Fynes-Clinton, and the first Intention was to seek the Divine blessing upon our parishes. It is hoped that this will be an annual event, and those desiring to receive notices of the next are invited to request them from the Catholic League Office. This was succeeded by the annual meeting of the Guardians of the Holy House of Walsingham. This is a body established for the purpose of holding the property of the Shrine and associated works, and for assuring the continuity of the services of the shrine, in case of a Vicar being appointed who might not be in sympathy. Not yet full in numbers, it is to consist of 12 priest Guardians and 12 lay, under the Master, the present Vicar, who has been presented, as a symbol of his office, with a most artistic hand-wrought silver cross and chain.

RESQUIESCAT IN PACE:
Wilmot Phillips, Priest
So soon after the death of the first Director of our Sodality we mourn the loss of Father Wilmot Phillips who, in spite of ill-health, undertook and held the office in his place almost exactly for one year. He was ordained priest in 1889; he worked at Brighton and at St James’s, Edgbaston, and during the pioneer work for the Faith at St Ethelburga’s, Bishopsgate, in the City, from 1894 to 1897, where he was in the midst of the disgraceful Protestant opposition. After eight years at St Philip’s, Clerkenwell, he was appointed Rector of Plaxtol, in Kent. He had acted as Master of the Society of Holy Cross, and gave his services ungrudgingly as Retreat Conductor as well as taking for some years our priests’ monthly Retreats at St Magnus’. His profound theological knowledge was of the greatest value to us and to a wide circle of priests, and his unending cheerfulness and lovable nature make his loss keenly felt by all his friends. A
solemn Mass of Requiem was celebrated on behalf of the League and Sodality at St Magnus’ on October 29th.

Messenger 90: 1938
CATHOLIC LEAGUE CHAPEL AT WALSINGHAM

A member of the League is providing for the building of one of the side chapels as a Chantry in the new extension of the Shrine of the Holy House of Walsingham. There are to be 15 Chapels in honour of the Mysteries of the Rosary and this one will be of the Crucifixion. Other Chapels are being provided by or for the Society of Our Lady of Walsingham, the Scouts, and as Chantries. This member hopes that the League will accept the offer that this Chapel will be regarded as the Catholic League Chapel, where there may be celebrated Masses for the League, and Requiems for members endowed. The League has been foremost from the beginning in supporting the pilgrimages and wonderful work of this National Shrine and it is fitting that we should be among those specially taking part in thus furthering Her honour. It is proposed by the Committee that the League should erect a statue or picture of its Patroness, our Lady of Victory, in the Chapel, to identify it with the League and as a sign of its devotion.

Messenger 92: 1938
THE CATHOLIC LEAGUE SHRINE AT WALSINGHAM
As already announced the donor of the Chapel of the Calvary has permission to place in it a Statue of Our Lady of Victory as the special shrine for the Catholic League in England’s Nazareth. The League was second to the “League of Our Lady,” (now the “Society of Mary,”) in organising Pilgrimages, and has ever since arranged one or two each year. It is fitting that we should therefore have our own Shrine there. The Society of Mary will have as its Chapel that of the Annunciation and is providing the Altar and Ornaments. The Calvary Chapel will have as Patrons, Our Lady and St John, and the title of “Victory” is specially symbolic here in telling of the Triumph of the Cross and of the Faith. There is also, especially in France, a great devotion to O.L. of Victory in connection with the conversion of England to the Faith, and with individual conversions. It was for this reason that this was the title chosen for Our Patroness. The figure preposed will be carved in wood, and coloured; 3ft high and the estimate £32. We hope for a fine coloured Gothic pedestal for £12: but both depend upon the response made to this appeal for money. Will each member send something so that we shall be adequately represented among other Catholic Societies?

JULY PILGRIMAGE
A weekend Pilgrimage to Walsingham is arranged by the League for July 15th – 17th, specially for those who cannot go in mid-week. A full notice is enclosed and members are asked to make it known to others. The interest will be great this year in seeing the completed extension of the Sanctuary.

WALSINGHAM
The dedication of the large extension of the Sanctuary with its fifteen Chapels of the Mysteries of the Rosary will be one of the historic events in the story of the Catholic revival: a reformation of the Church which must remain incomplete until there be restored amongst us a true and fervent devotion to our God bestowed Mother. Almighty God has raised up in England in these times of grievous heresy and apostasy a wonderful sign (that is indeed “spoken against”) of His care and His Revelation, “the Woman clothed with the Sun” who once appeared in the meadows of Walsingham and today leads her children in ever increasing thousands to her House “to show unto us the Blessed fruit of her womb, Jesus.” Under God we all owe immeasurable thanks to the refounder of the Shrine , Father Hope Patten, and his faithful coadjutor Father D Lingwood, and we would offer them our warmest congratulations in their joy in seeing the crown of their labours in the building of this lovely Shrine. They look for their reward only in the thronging of Mary’s children and in the constant evidence of the working of Divine Grace among the pilgrims.

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Messenger 93: 1939
THE WILMOT PHILLIPS MEMORIAL
The Priests of the Sodality are giving furnishings for the Wilmot Phillips–Arthur Tooth Chantry Chapel in the Sanctuary of Our Lady of Walsingham as a Memorial and it is thought that some other members of the Catholic League might care to be associated with them in their gift. The actual nature of the gift will, naturally, depend on the sum received. Some people have expressed a wish that their donation should be given to Father Limbert, the present Rector of Plaxtol, to assist him to put up a really fitting Memorial to Father Phillips in the Church where he laboured so faithfully for 27 years. This Memorial consists of beautifying the Sanctuary and replacing the temporary ornaments by more beautiful ones, thus making permanent what Father Phillips began to do and hoped to complete.

THE CATHOLIC LEAGUE SHRINE AT WALSINGHAM
As already announced the donor of the Chapel of the Calvary has permission to place in it a Statue of Our Lady of Victory as the special shrine for the Catholic League in England’s Nazareth. The League was second to the “League of Our Lady,” (now the “Society of Mary") in organising Pilgrimages, and has ever since arranged one or two each year. It is fitting that we should therefore have our own Shrine there. The Society of Mary will have as its Chapel that of the Annunciation and is providing the Altar and Ornaments. The Calvary Chapel will have as Patrons, Our Lady and St John, and the title of “Victory” is specially symbolic here in telling of the Triumph of the Cross and of the Faith. There is also, especially in France, a great devotion to OL of Victory in connection with the conversion of England to the Faith, and with individual conversions. It was for this reason that this was the title chosen for Our Patroness. The figure proposed will be carved in wood, and coloured: 3ft high and the estimate £32. The Canonesses of Our Lady of Victory at Edgware have given £12.10.0 for a carved and coloured Gothic pedestal. Will each member send something so that we shall be adequately represented among other Catholic Societies?

Messenger 97: 1940
C.L. PILGRIMAGE TO WALSINGHAM
Pilgrimages are being maintained and we feel that the League which was the second society to organise them should not be behindhand nor drop its annual meed to Our Lady. It would seem best that, as the Society of Mary makes its midweek one in August, we should again make ours in a weekend. But in view of the difficulties of war time we must be sure of filling a coach, which would start about 2 pm on Saturday and return Sunday evening. Total charge would be about £1.2.0. Will therefore those who desire to join in this for August the 31st, write at once to the Pilgrimage Secretary, St Magnus’ Vestry, Lower Thames Street, EC3. They will be notified as soon as possible whether the coach can be filled.

The Society of Mary has given a most beautiful Retable for its Altar, that of the Annunciation: a replica of a Della Robbia in baroque frame, gold and colour, of the First Mystery. This makes a very striking introduction to the series of the Chapels in the XV Mysteries.

Messenger 99: 1941
OUR LADY OF WALSINGHAM
What of the Shrine in these days of Stress? I have visited it twice lately: In May for the Installation of Fr Twisaday as Guardian in place of Fr Deakin, who to the great regret of all has resigned for ill health; and for other business. Then for the Annual Chapter of the Guardians, who supervise all the accounts and had grave problems to discuss. All is peaceful, beautiful and unscathed. But beneath there is the canker of financial anxiety. Pilgrims and visitors have almost disappeared, while the main expenses of upkeep, wages and the Clergy Fund remain to be satisfied.
Briefly the position of (a) of the Clergy Fund is that we owe for:
Overdraft at the Bank £ 58
Bank Loan £ 35
To Secretary and others £ 70
total £163
Our Liabilities are yearly £280
(b) of the Shrine Fund:
Overdraft at the Bank £170
Needed annually for Building Fund, rents, etc £200
For the Children’s Home £460
Most unwillingly we are obliged to beg for help from those already so heavily taxed and finding expenses and calls increasing on every side, yet all will agree that for the future of the Church in the land, for the conversion of England and for the honour of Mary, the Shrine of Her Holy House must be maintained “in being” as a centre of faith, prayer and spiritual power. For annual subscriptions, even the smallest, we are specially grateful and they can be sent to Fr Fynes-Clinton.

The twelve children, rescued from the persecution at St Hilary, are by the generosity of Fr Patten lodged, for economy and for the safety of the basement at nights, in the Vicarage. They are so happy, they have such an opportunity! Can we let them down?

“SPIRITUAL PILGRIMAGE”
Pilgrimages to Walsingham, as a closed area, being for the present impossible, the League, as last year, organised with the Society of Mary a “Spiritual” one, that is a visit to a Shrine with the same intention of honouring God and His Blessed Mother, Our Lady of Walsingham. On Saturday, June 7th, about 60 gathered at St Stephen’s, Gloucester Road, by the kind invitation of Fr Cheetham, who gave an address on “Our Lady by the Wayside.” Fr Fynes-Clinton, as Conductor, gave as Intentions Victory, Conversion of England, and the safety of and blessing on the Holy House. Litany BVM of entry to the beautifully Shrine, Mass, Stations, Intercessions, drinking of Walsingham waters, Vespers, Benediction, tea: these gave us a reflection of the loved village in Norfolk and revived such happy memories. The next day there was another pilgrimage at St Colomb’s, Notting Hill: and there is to be one at St Thomas’, Action Green, W12 on Saturday, July 12th. Any able to attend should send PC to Fr R E Young, there.

Let us all look forward to the National Peace Pilgrimage on – 194--!


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